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June 16, 2022

What I learned from Covid 19


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A few weeks ago, Adrienne and I attended the C3 Church conference in Tasmania and then stayed for a week’s holiday. We spent a great day in Port Arthur with some friends, visiting a world heritage site that was once a British penal colony. We rested, explored Hobart and hung out with friends. As we were about to check in for our flight home, we were reminded that if we had any Covid symptoms, we needed to take a test.  Since I had a slight sore throat, I did and… tested positive. In a single moment our plans changed from heading home, to being stuck in Hobart.

Our stay at the hotel couldn’t be extended. There was very little accommodation available in Hobart. We ended up in a tiny, dark hotel room that felt like a prison. Being upfront about our condition meant that they wouldn’t service the room. We would have had to order Uber Eats every meal. It was stressful, but I came out on the other side of my sickness having learned a thing or two.

What I’ve Learnt:

Friendship:

Should not be taken for granted. I texted a friend in the area and told them the situation. During my burnout a few years ago, he had offered to let us stay at his adjoined apartment, but we hadn’t yet been able to take him up on it. He and his wife made it available to us and said we could stay as long as we needed. They had made us a pot of soup for us as we arrived. Our friends even let us use their car to get there and for Adrienne to go out for groceries and medications until she tested positive three days later. They provided meals for us both over three nights. They were so kind and caring. 

Technology:

Is an awesome tool. Covid affects people in different ways—fortunately, Adrienne had a mild dose. I was getting progressively worse and had to video call a doctor. He was able to write out an escript. That reaffirmed how important and vital technology can be, especially in difficult and trying situations, and for coaching and mentoring when not able to meet face-to-face.  

Prayers

The prayers of our friends were so valuable: being able to tell friends the situation and ask them to pray. Knowing they were thinking of us, praying and loving us from afar, made us feel appreciated and safe. God works through the prayers of others.

Time

Recovery takes time and it is different for different people: It’s so important to give yourself space for rest; the same as with burnout, or an injury. As I’ve mentored people during Covid, the importance of self-care after Covid has become increasingly clear. It’s okay you aren’t 100 percent. Take the time to be restored. Pace yourself while you recover. Adjust the calendar when needed. Postpone those appointments that require you to be at your very best. 

Restored

Know what helps you feel restored: for me it was being able to walk along the beach after I was out of isolation. This peaceful activity allowed me to refill the tank and find clarity about what is important. Some people wrestle with big decisions in recovery mode which can be disastrous because it is hard to see clearly. Covid can impact emotions. Being able to find time to focus on the present process can be difficult, especially if you have a stressful job. The best thing to do though is to accept this as a time of recovery; a medical necessity. It can be a great time to slow down and feel grateful for the people around you. 

I’m happy to say that Adrienne and I are back in Queensland, and feeling back to health—yet with a greater sense of gratitude for modern technology, my health and my friends. 

Whether you have dealt with Covid or not, it’s good to think ahead: 

  • Who can you call on when in need? 
  • Who can pray for you? 
  • Who would house and feed you? 
  • How do you restore yourself? 
  • What adjustments do you need to make to your calendar during recovery? 

Psalm 23:3 (NLT)

He renews my strength. He guides me along right paths, bringing honour to his name.

Continue reading with these articles…

  1. Thank you Don for your openness and honesty.
    We should never take for granted the areas of our health.
    So great to have you both back, well and rested.

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